Project Management Templates and FNL Examples

Whether your project is small or large, the templates available below provide you with easy to use tools for managing your projects in a consistent manner. A brief purpose statement is included for each template. Please click on the link to begin the download process.

Action Items – This template is used to capture action items, which are tasks too small to warrant being placed on the (more formal) project schedule.

Assumptions - This template is used to capture project assumptions, which are factors that we make to be true that are not proven to be so.

Budget - This template is used to capture a top-down estimate of the budget - how much the project will cost, which may be measured in dollars ($), Personnel (FTE-mo.), or both.

Change Log - This template captures changes to the baseline project plan.

Charter - The Charter is a high-level document generated early in the project and is a key Project Management deliverable created in the Initiation stage of a project intended to get key stakeholders into agreement on important aspects of the project. In its simplest form, the Charter authorizes the existence of the project and bestows formal authority on the Project Manager to manage it. In a more comprehensive format, the Charter defines all key aspects of the project at a high-level.

Communications - This template is used to capture all of the communications that are to be included in the management of the project.

Constraints - This template is used to capture project constraints, which are anything that limits the team’s options in achieving project objectives (scope, schedule, budget).

Decisions - This template captures project decisions, which are the resolutions of situations or questions by a person of appropriate authority.

Deliverables - This template is used to capture project deliverables, which are verifiable outputs or results of the project. Projects often create multiple deliverables where some are "intermediate" and others are "final" deliverables.

Executive Project Plan – The Executive Project Plan workflow will guide you through the fundamentals of project planning in a logical and concise manner, subsequently creating an executive summary of your project. By summarizing the critical characteristics of your project you can easily transfer this information into your Executive Project Plan template. The use of this template may be dependent on the size and scope of your project.

External Dependencies - This template is used to capture external dependencies, which are tasks, events, or deliverables that are outside of the Project Manager's control (performed by someone not on the project team) that must happen before the project can progress.

Issues Log - This template is used to capture issues, which are problems that the team is currently dealing with.

Lessons Learned - This template is used to capture lessons learned, which are things to be remembered that will lead to better project management in the future. These typically fall into two categories: went well or could be improved.

Management Status Report - The Management Status report is a high-level document generated periodically during the execution stage of the project to keep management up-to-date on progress.

Meeting Minutes - This template is used to capture Meeting Minutes, which are the key elements discussed at the various project meetings. This template is composed of sections from several other templates (Decisions, Assumptions, Action Items, Issues, Risks) and any data entered here is also entered into the respective template for overall tracking purposes.

Milestones - This template is used to capture milestones, which are key project progress indicators.

Out-of-Scope - This template is used to capture project/product requirements, which are out-of-scope and therefore will NOT be included in the project.

Project Plan - The Project Plan builds on the Charter by developing the details behind various high-level concepts. This Project Plan contains the details behind various project components including, scope, schedule, budget, priorities, risks, and communications. The use of this template may be dependent on the size and scope of your project

Project Plan Outline (Example) – This Project Plan is another example of a more detailed project plan.

Requirements - This template is used to capture product requirements, which are characteristics of the project deliverable(s) that reflect customer needs. The term "product requirements" implies that the deliverable is a "product". However, the term applies equally to deliverables that are "services" or "processes."

Risks - This template is used to capture project risks, which are future events or conditions that if it occurring will have either a positive or a negative impact on the project (scope, schedule, and/or budget).

Stakeholders - This template is used to capture information on project stakeholders, which includes anyone with a vested interest in the project.

Status Reporting - The primary intent of a status reporting is to have a consistent mechanism for project managers to report the project’s progress to plan.

Team Member Status Report - The Team Member Status Report is a detailed document generated periodically during the execution stage of the project by the Project Manager to gage the progress of individual team members. The Project Manager may create this report for themselves or provide it to individual team members to help them stay on top of project activities that they own.