2014 August

HIV Integration at Certain Sites in Host DNA Is Linked to the Expansion and Persistence of Infected Cells

See caption for details.

Editor’s note: This article was originally published on the Center for Cancer Research website.

When the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infects a cell, the virus inserts a copy of its genetic material into the host cell’s DNA. The inserted genetic material, which is also called a provirus, is used to produce new viruses. Because the viral DNA can be inserted at many sites in the host cell DNA, the site of integration marks each infected cell. Patients infected with HIV are currently treated with combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), which prevents viral replication in the majority of treated patients. When cART is initiated, most HIV-infected cells die in one or two days, and more of the infected cells die over a period of weeks to months. However there are some long-lived infected cells that do not die, which prevents patients from being cured.

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Former Intern: Amy Stull Returns to Her Roots

Portrait of Amy Stull.

By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer

When Amy Stull, a 2000 graduate of Walkersville High School, began working in a laboratory at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at Frederick, she likely did not know the role NCI would play in her career.

Stull started at NCI as a Werner H. Kirsten (WHK) student intern after her junior year of high school, working in a lab as she prepared for a career in chemical engineering. The student intern program pairs rising high school seniors with laboratory scientists to encourage the students to pursue careers in both science and health care fields.

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Dunk Tank Hits the Mark at Take Your Child To Work Day

Man being dunked in dunk tank.

By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer

Robin Winkler-Pickett has known Jim Cherry, Ph.D., scientific program director, and Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., director, Office of Scientific Operations, both NCI at Frederick, for many years. “We’ve been friends for a long time.”

So when she heard about the chance to dunk each of them at Take Your Child to Work Day (TYCTWD) on June 25, Winkler-Pickett, a research biologist in the Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, NCI Center for Cancer Research, knew she had to make time to participate.

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