Publications

Platinum Publications as of February 26, 2015

Platinum Publications graphic

Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above.

Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

Tags: 

A Novel Ras Effector Pathway Found to Play Significant Role in Tumor Suppression

A man and a woman by a poster.

Peter Johnson, Ph.D., and Jacqueline Salotti, Ph.D., Mouse Cancer Genetics Program.

By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer; photo by Richard Frederickson, Staff PhotographerPlatinum Highlight Icon

Normal cells have mechanisms to prevent the development of cancer. Among these is a type of tumor suppressor mechanism known as oncogene-induced senescence, or OIS, which halts the uncontrolled growth of cells caused by mutations in oncogenes. The oncogene Ras plays a crucial role in inducing OIS through a specific cascade of proteins, as reported in a recent article in Molecular and Cellular Biology by Jacqueline Salotti, Ph.D., and colleagues in the Eukaryotic Transcriptional Regulation Section of the Mouse Cancer Genetics Program, Center for Cancer Research (CCR).

Tags: 

Platinum Publications as of November 26, 2014

Platinum Publications graphic

Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above.

Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

Tags: 

Interaction between EphrinB1 and CNK1 Found to Play Role in Tumor Progression

Two scientists in the lab. Doctor Cho is on left and Doctor Daar is on right.

Hee Jun Cho, Ph.D., left, with Ira Daar, Ph.D., senior investigator, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling. 

Platinum Highlight Icon

By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer

The family of proteins known as ephrins plays a critical role in a variety of biological processes. In a recent article in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Hee Jun Cho, Ph.D., and colleagues report on the interaction between proteins CNK1 and ephrinB1 that promotes cell movement. Their findings may have an important implication in developing new therapeutics for reducing metastases in certain cancers.

“Eph and ephrin signaling has become an area of intense interest due to the influence these molecules exert on the control of cell adhesion and cell movement,” Cho said. “This signaling affects the formation of tissues during development and has been shown to play an instructive role in angiogenesis, as well as tumor cell invasion.”

Tags: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Publications