Technology Transfer

Next-Generation Entrepreneurs Ready to Advance Breast Cancer Research Innovations

Breast Cancer Start-up Challenge logo

By Michele Newton and Thomas Stackhouse, Contributing Writers, and Rosemarie Truman, Guest Writer

Editor’s note: In May 2014, the Breast Cancer Start-Up Challenge was named one of six finalists in the HHS Innovates Award Competition. This award celebrates innovations developed by employees of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to support the mission of HHS. In the final phase of the competition, the public will be invited to help select “The People’s Choice” winner; public voting takes place May 29 through June 6, 2014.        

Tags: 

Before You Collaborate, You Should Partner with NCI TTC

NCI Technology Transfer Center staff

NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) staff (Frederick). Center: Tom Stackhouse, Ph.D., associate director; surrounded by (left to right) Rose Freel, Jasmine Yang, Heidi Bowman, Kevin Brand, Chris Sappington, Jeff Thomas, Mike Currens, Joseph Miles, Kathy Higinbotham, Donna Bialozor, and Karen Surabian.

By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Jeffrey W. Thomas, Contributing Writers

As the fall and winter seasons progress, you may be attending more scientific conferences, where you may find a number of opportunities for research collaborations.

To assist your lab in reaching its research goals through collaborations, the staff of the National Cancer Institute Technology Transfer Center (NCI TTC) can guide you through a tool box of agreements you may need for protecting your intellectual property (IP) and effectively managing your collaboration. 

Tags: 

Nineteen Patents Issued in 2012 for Inventions by Frederick Researchers

Scientific figure

The figure, representing US Patent 8,198,402 (Smoothened polypeptides and methods of use), illustrates the design principle used for generating the Hedgehog pathway inhibitors disclosed in the patent: folding the inhibitors through an interaction with the cellular membrane.  Membrane anchoring through lipidation allows the membrane to facilitate the folding of short protein fragments and the conversion of these fragments into potent inhibitors of the corresponding protein. Folding the inhibitors into the appropriate conformation is critical to their activity.

By Karen Surabian, Contributing Writer

Patents provide a period of exclusivity and are a way to exclude others from making, using, or selling an inventor’s novel technology. For the National Institutes of Health (NIH), patents are an incentive for an outside party to license, develop, and commercialize NIH technologies that will benefit public health, especially those that require substantial further development by an outside party, such as therapeutics and diagnostics.

Tags: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Technology Transfer