Technology Transfer

Nineteen Patents Issued in 2012 for Inventions by Frederick Researchers

Scientific figure

The figure, representing US Patent 8,198,402 (Smoothened polypeptides and methods of use), illustrates the design principle used for generating the Hedgehog pathway inhibitors disclosed in the patent: folding the inhibitors through an interaction with the cellular membrane.  Membrane anchoring through lipidation allows the membrane to facilitate the folding of short protein fragments and the conversion of these fragments into potent inhibitors of the corresponding protein. Folding the inhibitors into the appropriate conformation is critical to their activity.

By Karen Surabian, Contributing Writer

Patents provide a period of exclusivity and are a way to exclude others from making, using, or selling an inventor’s novel technology. For the National Institutes of Health (NIH), patents are an incentive for an outside party to license, develop, and commercialize NIH technologies that will benefit public health, especially those that require substantial further development by an outside party, such as therapeutics and diagnostics.

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New Website Helps You Find What You Need

Website screenshot

The NCI TTC’s redesigned website provides an inviting, user-friendly environment.

By Karen Surabian, Contributing Writer

The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center (NCI’s TTC) recently launched a redesign of its website. New graphics, color scheme, and updated features provide a user-friendly environment for finding information related to technology transfer at NCI.

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CRADAs: They're Not Just for NCI Anymore

Two hands shaking.

By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Jeffrey Thomas, Contributing Writers, and Bruce Crise, Guest Writer

Advancing scientific discovery is increasingly dependent on diverse and innovative partnerships, and the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is an essential tool for establishing partnerships. CRADAs allow a federal laboratory to enter into collaborative research and development (R&D) projects with outside parties (commercial or nonprofit).

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New Location Improves Efficiency

Two women talking.

Jennifer Troyer (left), a senior scientist in the Laboratory of Molecular Technology, consults with Courtney Silverthorn, an IP specialist, in the atrium of the ATRF. The SAIC-Frederick IP Office often works with scientists from the Advanced Technology Program.

By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer

The physical proximity of the SAIC-Frederick Intellectual Property (IP) Office to the NCI Technology Transfer Center (NCI-TTC) is one of the many benefits of being at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF), according to Courtney Silverthorn, Ph.D. Being in one location “has increased the effectiveness of both informal communication and formal meetings. We have already brainstormed solutions for several issues in the hallway during an informal chat,” said Silverthorn, an SAIC-Frederick IP specialist.

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