Features

Echoes from the Past: Program Pioneers a Path for Frederick’s Science, Part 3

Unsurprisingly, the new Basic Research Program at the Frederick Cancer Research Center took some time to gain momentum despite the preparations that had been made. Margaret Kripke, Ph.D., head of the program’s Immunobiology of Physical and Chemical Carcinogenesis Section at the time, recalls that her first year was dedicated to setting up her new laboratory, hiring staff, moving around, and finishing projects she had started in her former laboratory at University of Utah.

Echoes from the Past: Program Pioneers a Path for Frederick’s Science, Part 1

As the winter of 1973 turned to spring, the Frederick Cancer Research Center (FCRC), the forerunner to the Frederick National Laboratory and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at Frederick that exist today, neared the one-year mark since its opening. The more than 250 employees had made sound progress, given the challenges of converting the old Fort Detrick biowarfare facilities into a fledgling cancer center. Their efforts had drawn some attention, too.

Serendipitous Collaboration Leads to Potential Therapy for Liver Cancer

The old adage that says two heads are better than one certainly seems true for Mitchell Ho, Ph.D., a senior investigator in the Center for Cancer Research, and Xiaolin Wu, Ph.D., a principal scientist in the Genomics Technology Laboratory, a CCR Core at the Frederick National Laboratory. Together, these two scientists are using next-generation genomics technology to develop, in an animal model, a chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy that might help patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common type of liver cancer.

Echoes from the Past: A New Institution for Cancer Research Is Born

On October 18, 1971, President Richard Nixon emerged from the U.S. Army Post Headquarters at Fort Detrick into the sunlight of one of Frederick’s signature autumn mornings. Nearby, a crowd of dignitaries, Army officers, and journalists from local and national news outlets had gathered to hear his remarks about the former biowarfare research facility. He greeted them, paused to make a good-natured joke about the Baltimore Orioles, then delivered an announcement that altered the course of biomedical research in the United States.

NCI to Dedicate Millions of Dollars to Help Patients Enrolled in Clinical Trials

During an address to the recent annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, NCI Director Norman “Ned” Sharpless, M.D., announced that the National Cancer Institute is committing $10 million to support NCI-run clinical trials this year. The funds, which will be given in addition to the normal budget, are dedicated to trials conducted within the NCI Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) and the NCI Community Oncology Research Program.

Scientific Library Offers New Training Options

The Scientific Library is expanding its current training opportunities by offering webinars, allowing employees to take advantage of trainings from the comfort of their own offices. Due to the nature of their work, some employees find it inconvenient to attend in-person training classes; others simply prefer to use their own computers. The Scientific Library has been experimenting with webinar sessions since 2016 and expanded the service in 2017. Now, due to the popularity of webinars, it plans to offer even more webinar training sessions.

NCI Helps Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia to Identify and Treat New Target in Pediatric Cancer

There may be a new, more effective method for treating high-risk neuroblastoma, according to scientists at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and collaborators in the Cancer and Inflammation Program at NCI at Frederick. Together, the groups published a study describing a previously unrecognized protein on neuroblastoma cells, called GPC2, as well as the creation of a novel antibody-drug conjugate, a combination of a human antibody and a naturally occurring anticancer drug, that locates and binds to GPC2 in a highly efficient way.