The Wait Is Over

new building

By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer

At a March 2010 gathering at the construction site of the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF), Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., associate director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), noted that the facility would be a place where public–private partnerships will produce the next generation of diagnostics and treatments for cancer and AIDS. The completion of the facility, he said, “is anticipated by the 1.5 million Americans who get cancer every year….They anxiously await this construction” (News & Views, April 2010, page 3).

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ATRF Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony Coincides with Chamber of Commerce Centennial Gala

People cutting a ribbon.

From left, U.S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, NCI Deputy Director for Management John Czajkowski, and SAIC Corporate CEO John Jumper prepare to cut the ribbon at the ATRF on May 21.

By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer

U.S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, NCI Deputy Director for Management John Czajkowski, and SAIC Corporate Chief Executive Officer (CEO) John Jumper were joined by representatives of the Frederick County Chamber of Commerce in cutting the ribbon for the National Cancer Institute’s Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF).

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Genetics Research Discovered in a Bestseller

man holding book and aritcle.

Amar Klar holds the novel in which his research on yeast genetics was accurately described by the author, who is not a scientist and has never even met Klar. In his right hand, Klar holds a photo of himself that was taken in 1979 at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, where he performed the research.

By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer

One morning in early January, Amar Klar sat down at his computer and found an e-mail with a curious message from a colleague.

While reading a bestselling novel, The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides, his colleague, a professor at Princeton University, found a description of research on yeast genetics that was surprisingly similar to Klar’s early research. Even the laboratory in the novel was reminiscent of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, where Klar had conducted his research.

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Ned Greenberg: 50 Years and Counting

Man at computer

Ned Greenberg is a chemist in the Biological Testing Branch, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research.

By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer

Can you imagine working for the same company for 50 years? Nathaniel “Ned” Greenberg has accomplished just that, having recently received his 50-year service award from NIH, and he has no immediate plans for retirement.

“I don’t look upon my job as a chore, it’s more of an avocation than a vocation,” said Greenberg, a chemist in the Biological Testing Branch (BTB), under Branch Chief Melinda Hollingshead, DVM, Ph.D. “I am lucky that I found something that I enjoy doing.”

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Frederick National Laboratory Celebrates 40 Years

President Nixon at Ft. Detrick, MD.

President Richard Nixon visited Fort Detrick on October 19, 1971, to announce that the biological warfare facility would be converted into what we know today as the Frederick National Laboratory.

By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer

Forty years ago, what we now call the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research was born. Here are some highlights in the facility’s history.

October 19, 1971 – President Richard Nixon announced that Fort Detrick would be converted from a biological warfare facility to a cancer research center (Covert, Norman M., Cutting Edge: A History of Fort Detrick, Maryland, 1943–1993, pp. 85–87).

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These Women Make a Difference in Our Lives

Four women's portraits

Clockwise from top left: Rachel Bagni, Cheryl Lamb, Karen McNitt, Julie Hartman

By Maritta Perry Grau, Staff Writer

Producing viral vectors for in vitro and in vivo studies, evaluating new technologies, organizing outreach and internal events and special programs, preparing site visit reports, helping make newcomers feel comfortable, collaborating on statistics and other projects—these are just some of the ways that the women of the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research go about their everyday work lives—and in the process, make history.

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