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Gut Microorganisms Found Necessary for Successful Cancer Therapy

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By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer

Humans play host to trillions of microorganisms that help our bodies perform basic functions, like digestion, growth, and fighting disease. In fact, bacterial cells outnumber the human cells in our bodies by 10 to 1.1

The tens of trillions of microorganisms thriving in our intestines are known as gut microbiota, and those that are not harmful to us are referred to as commensal microbiota. In a recent paper in Science, NCI scientists described their discovery that, in mice, the presence of commensal microbiota is needed for successful response to cancer therapy.

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Novel Vaccine Approach Achieves “Functional Cure” of AIDS Virus in Monkeys

Jeff Lifson, Brandon Keele, Jacob Estes, and Michael Piatak

By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer, and Jeff Lifson, Guest Writer

Scientists at the Oregon Health & Science University and the AIDS and Cancer Virus Program of the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research have used a novel vaccine approach to achieve a “functional cure” and apparent eradication of infection with a monkey version of the AIDS virus.

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