Science

2019 Technology Showcase Highlights Technologies, Partnerships—and Frederick

Rich Bendis, CEO of BioHealth Innovation, delivers the keynote address

Frederick has become a key player in biomedical research. That was the clear message from the third annual Technology Showcase, hosted by the National Cancer Institute and the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research. As usual, the event highlighted the numerous technologies developed by NCI and FNL scientists that are available to external groups for licensing and partnership. But this year, it also showcased the strength of the region.

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What’s the Buzz About? Fly Research Leads to Unexpected Epilepsy Discovery

Image of flies inside a transparent container in the Cancer and Developmental Biology Laboratory

Govind Kunduri, Ph.D., watched as a bright light illuminated a transparent tube full of mutant fruit flies. Then, as he prepared to collect data, something unexpected occurred: the flies began having seizures. The flies’ surprising behavior seemed epileptic, but Kunduri, a postdoctoral fellow in the Cancer and Developmental Biology Laboratory (CDBL), part of the Center for Cancer Research at NCI at Frederick, hadn’t intended to study epilepsy.

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Two Investigators—One Aspiring and One Retiring—Share Discovery, Legacy, and Connection

Dr. Dennis Klinman stands with Begum Horuluoglu in their NCI at Frederick laboratory

Dennis Klinman, M.D., Ph.D., says science is like the surface of a sphere—there are thousands of possible connections between different points. It is fitting, therefore, that on the eve of his retirement, the senior investigator has helped a young scientist connect with her passion.

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Inside the Scientific Arsenal: The High-Speed Racetrack That Can Make Proteins Explode

Photo of Ben Orsburn and coworker Carly Van Wagoner flanked by the Fusion and two other mass spectrometers

Ben Orsburn, Ph.D., stood in the middle of a 180-square-foot laboratory, speaking over the white noise that flooded the room. The source of the din—large, desk-sized objects called mass spectrometers—filled nearby rows of lab benches. Orsburn pointed to one along the periphery of the room, a white-and-black box with the words “Orbitrap Fusion” emblazoned on the front in small blue text.

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