A group of red items for American Heart Month
Thursday, February 27, 2014

By Camille Rees, Guest Writer

February is American Heart Month, and Feb. 7 was designated “National Wear Red Day” by the American Heart Association.

The American Heart Association has sponsored the “Go Red for Women” campaign for 10 years. The message: heart disease is the number one killer of women.

Did you know that more women die of heart disease than men?  In fact, it is more deadly than all forms of cancer combined. Over the years, the red dress has become the symbol of the fight against heart disease in women.

George Vande Woude, Ph.D.
Thursday, February 27, 2014

Editor’s Note: This article was adapted from a press release and biographical information from the Van Andel Research Institute’s website: http://www.vai.org/en/NewsRoom/press-release-01-28-14.aspx.

Larry Keefer, Ph.D.
Thursday, February 27, 2014

By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer

When Larry Keefer, Ph.D., first arrived at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) more than 40 years ago, he didn’t have a physical lab to call his own. Not immediately, anyway, due to a glitch in the construction schedule, he explained.                  

So he spent his first few years in Bethesda doing administrative work, like reviewing proposals and serving as a project officer on contracts.

HIV DRP logo
Thursday, February 20, 2014

By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer

The HIV Drug Resistance Program (HIV DRP), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), will hold a conference on “Host Factors and Cofactors in HIV Infection” at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) campus in Frederick, Md., on Feb. 25, from 1:00 to 5:35 p.m.

Group photo of four scientists
Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Platinum Highlight Icon

By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer

Humans play host to trillions of microorganisms that help our bodies perform basic functions, like digestion, growth, and fighting disease. In fact, bacterial cells outnumber the human cells in our bodies by 10 to 1.1

The tens of trillions of microorganisms thriving in our intestines are known as gut microbiota, and those that are not harmful to us are referred to as commensal microbiota. In a recent paper in Science, NCI scientists described their discovery that, in mice, the presence of commensal microbiota is needed for successful response to cancer therapy.